Tuesday, December 11, 2018



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Podcast with Frank Ford, co-author, Happy Accidents, about the transformative power of improv

Posted by Elena del Valle on February 26, 2018

Frank Ford, co-author, Happy Accidents

Frank Ford, co-author, Happy Accidents

Photo: Courtesy of Four Day Weekend

A podcast interview with Frank Ford, co-author, Happy Accidents the Transformative Power of “Yes, and” at work and in Life, is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses the transformative power of improv with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Frank has had a successful career in the entertainment industry for the last 25 years and is one of the founding members and owner of Four Day Weekend, a Texas comedy company. He has also studied at the Second City Conservatory in Chicago and taught advanced improvisation classes at the Four Day Weekend Training Center. Frank has appeared in numerous commercial spots, television shows and films. In addition, he has been recognized for his original comedy revues, comedy album, short films and acting roles. In addition to performing in over 5,000 shows and working with Fortune 500 companies throughout the world, Frank is a keynote presenter on the speaker circuit.

To listen to the interview, scroll down until you see “Podcast Frank Ford” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR ” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the February 2018 section of the podcast archive.


Click to buy Happy Accidents




Podcast with Alex Parkinson, associate director, Society for New Communications Research about the Society

Posted by Elena del Valle on February 20, 2018

Alex Parkinson, associate director, Society for New Communications Research

Alex Parkinson, associate director, Society for New Communications Research

Photo: Jaycee Crawford

A podcast interview with Alex Parkinson, associate director, Society for New Communications Research is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses the Society with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Alex is also senior researcher at the Society for New Communications Research of The Conference Board (SNCR). He specializes in corporate philanthropy, and communications and marketing, and is the executive editor of the Giving Thoughts and SNCR blogs and accompanying online publications.

Alex led the integration effort between the Society for New Communications Research (SNCR) and The Conference Board when the two organizations came together in February 2016. He is a member of the SNCR Advisory Board.

Before joining The Conference Board in September 2013, he worked as a senior consultant in London and New York for Context. At the time he advised his clients Bloomberg, Brown-Forman, BSkyB, Burt's Bees, Cisco, HP, International Paper, PepsiCo, Roche, Standard Chartered, Syngenta, Teva Pharmaceuticals, and Vodafone corporate social responsibility communications and strategy development.

To listen to the interview, scroll down until you see “Podcast Alex Parkinson” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR ” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the February 2018 section of the podcast archive.

Opinion writer discusses women’s issues in audiobook

Posted by Elena del Valle on February 15, 2018

Jill Filipovic, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, believes women want the freedom to pursue happiness without gender, class, location and identity biases and constraints. In The H-Spot The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness (Hachette Audio, $30) she discusses her experiences, her research and the impressions she formed from conversations with some women and men from various parts of the country.

In the audiobook, narrated by the author, she explores the history of working women in the United States and her concerns about the pervasive inequality that plagues our country. She outlines the burden presented by high standards of feminine perfection for women and the requirement that they be willing to sacrifice their happiness and well being for their loved ones, while she acknowledges that some of the standards are perpetuated by women. She highlights that the requirements for being a “good mother” have never been so extreme. The author points out the need for political and social changes at the national level.

Multiple requests over several weeks to respond to book related questions and for a book image via her website, Twitter and her publisher were unanswered. According to a biography for Filipovic on her publisher's website she is a regular columnist for Cosmopolitan.com, where she was previously a senior political writer. A former columnist for the Guardian, she is also an attorney. The biography also indicates that her work on law, politics, gender and foreign affairs has appeared in The Washington Post, Time, Nation, and Foreign Policy.
Click to buy The H-Spot

Brand Naming, The Unsubtle (Trump) And The Subtle (Pharmaceuticals)

Posted by Elena del Valle on February 6, 2018

By Jay Gronlund
President, The Pathfinder Group

Jay Gronlund

Jay Gronlund, president, The Pathfinder Group

Photo: Jay Gronlund

Most people think “branding” is simply about creating a catchy, memorable name for a product, service, organization and even people. However branding is much more complex. Good branding starts with the development of a message or impression that reflects the unique benefits and characteristics of that entity, and then creating a name that ideally communicates its qualities and personality to targeted customers. There are numerous approaches and philosophies for brand naming. Here are two contrasting examples: President Donald Trump’s tendency to coin descriptive, simplistic (and usually negative) labels on his adversaries that reflect his opinion of them, and the more subconscious, subliminal use of “phonologics” by pharmaceutical companies to create brand names for their products.

Click to read the entire article Brand Naming, The Unsubtle (Trump) And The Subtle (Pharmaceuticals)