Friday, November 24, 2017



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Corporate trainer shares her ideas on influence

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 31, 2017

Influence Redefined

Influence Redefined

Photos: Stacey Hanke

After 25 years of experience teaching others how to communicate Stacey Hanke is convinced 95 percent of leaders are less influential than they think they are. It is called Illusory Superiority or the Above Average Effect when people judge themselves better than average, she says in Influence Redefined Be the Leader You Were Meant to Be, Monday to Monday (Greenleaf, $23.95).

In the 251-page hardcover book published this year for leaders, directors to C-suite, and sales professionals Hanke outlines what she believes are the issues leaders face in today's highly digital business environment. She says the classic definition of influence is outdated, emphasizing that if a leader's audience isn't paying attention to him or her she or he can't influence them.

When asked what prompted her to write the book now, the author replied by email via her publicist, “After partnering with leaders over the past 15 years to help them enhance their influence, the same challenges came up. Most individuals believe they are more influential than they really are. I have a passion to increase leaders awareness of how their listeners perceive them rather than what they believe to be true. To give leaders practical and immediate how to’s for growing their influence Monday to Monday®. Why now – because we are living in a new world of work called noise. 24/7 every day we are receiving messages. Therefore it is more difficult than ever before to stand out from the noise, to be memorable and to influence Monday to Monday.”

The book is divided into 12 chapters in three main parts: Influence Redefined, The Drivers of Influence and The Elements of Influence. At the end of the chapters there is a bullet point summary followed by recommended action steps.

Stacey Hanke, author, Influence Redefined

Stacey Hanke, author, Influence Redefined

From idea the publication it took her 3.5 years to publish the book. She explained, “I wanted to make sure I had the keys to why some individuals are more influential. I wanted to take the time to do the research and to interview top influencers. Narrowing down all of the content and ideas I had for writing the book was the greatest challenge. The greatest reward has been the positive feedback I receive from my readers!”

“Influence means your body language and messaging are consistent Monday to Monday,” she said when asked to define the term. “The second part of this definition is moving people to take action long after the interaction has occurred.”

When asked what factors affect people's influence most she said, “Body language being consistent with message, consistency – no one ever needs to guess who is going to show up, adaptability – being able to adapt your message on the fly to meet your listeners expectations without ever skipping a beat, impact – having impact on your listener that makes you and your message memorable and un-resistible to act on your recommendations.”

In response to a question about the impact of gender, age, race bias, socio-economic characteristics on influence, she replied, “Influence is a choice. Anyone can have influence Monday to Monday® if they’re willing to do the work, be consistent and never stop learning.”


Influence Redefined

Click to buy Influence Redefined




Harvard University Director of Communications and Outreach

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 21, 2017

· Job Title: Director of Communications and Outreach

· Company Name: Harvard University

· Location: Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02108

15-Aug-2017
Director of Communications and Outreach
Harvard Kennedy School
43484BR

Duties & Responsibilities The Director of Communications and Outreach at the Malcolm Wiener for Social Policy works closely with the Click to read the entire Job Ad for Harvard University Director of Communications and Outreach

Listen to podcast with Jody Foster, M.D., author, The Schmuck in My Office, about what to do about difficult work personalities

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 21, 2017

Jody Foster, M.D., author, The Schmuck in My Office

Jody Foster, M.D., author, The Schmuck in My Office

Photo: St. Martin's Press

A podcast interview with Jody Foster, M.D., author, The Schmuck in My Office 10 Difficult Work Personalities & What to do About Them (St. Martin's Press, $25.99) is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, she discusses what to do about difficult people at work with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Jody is a clinical professor of Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, vice chair of Clinical Operations, Department of Psychiatry in the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and chair, Department of Psychiatry at Pennsylvania Hospital. Her clinical practice includes general psychiatry, with a special emphasis on treating acute inpatients, psychopharmacology, and corporate development that provides support and evaluation services to executives.

She completed a residency and a chief residency in psychiatry and a fellowship in clinical psychopharmacology and mood disorders at The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital. She also attained her masters of business administration, with a concentration in finance, from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

To listen to the interview, click on the play button below, scroll down until you see “Podcast” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR Jody Foster, M.D.” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the August 2017 section of the podcast archive.

Retirement expert shares advice in short easy to read book

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 17, 2017

How To Retire with Enough Money

How To Retire with Enough Money

Photo: Workman Publishing

Are decisions about retirement on your mind? How much should you save? Where should you keep your money? Should you rely on an investment specialist? In How To Retire With Enough Money and How To Know What Enough Is (Workman Publishing, $12.95) retirement expert Teresa Ghilarducci (see Listen to podcast with Teresa Ghilarducci, author, How To Retire With Enough Money about her book) outlines what she considers the essential facts to prepare readers financially for the final years of their life.

“I wrote How To Retire With Enough Money because I found too many people were racked by guilt and shame because they didn't have enough savings to retire,” the economist said by email. “But it's not their fault entirely, the system is stacked against most people's retirement savings. I wanted to empower people to overcome the forces barring them from having enough money in retirement.”

The 128-page easy to read hardcover book was published in 2015 and is divided into six chapters: Facing the Facts; Bringing Your Picture into Focus; Working; Saving, Spending and Debt; Investing and Allocation; and Voting and Civic Involvement. Described on the back cover as a having "just financial common sense that's guaranteed to work," the book offers a positive and succinct approach to retirement. The author favors downsizing before retirement and offers strategies to cut back on spending. She strongly advises against relying on a financial advisor and urges readers to relocate their assets to low-cost index funds.

When asked how she would measure the success of her book she replied: “I will know I succeeded if people reading this How To Retire With Enough Money lowered their investment fees, fired their "guy" (the conflicted advisor), saved at least ten percent of their income by reducing debt and increasing their savings, and kept a monthly budget. Keeping a monthly budget is the key, the trailhead, to the path to financial empowerment.” When asked if the book was sponsored in any way she replied, “I received no money or benefit from any firm mentioned in the book. (I praise Vanguard from genuine regard and respect.).”

Teresa Ghilarducci, author, How To Retire with Enough Money

Teresa Ghilarducci, author, How To Retire with Enough Money

The book required three years of work. She wrote it for workers of all ages. The author emphasized that saving at younger ages is a lot less painful than waiting to catch up; and that a person reaches the same financial goal by saving a much smaller share of their income if they start in their 20s rather than their 40s.

Regarding retirement issues, the author said, “The greatest obstacle to retirement saving is that most employers don't offer a way for people to save at the workplace and when they do the law allows people to withdraw their money before retirement. Also federal government subsidies, in the form of tax breaks, favor the wealthy.”

About the challenges she faced when she set out to write the book she said, “One small challenge was convincing my publisher that I didn't want to make people rich, I wanted people to have enough. (It wasn't that hard, the publisher was fantastic and taught me a lot.) The main challenge was to write the book so I didn't scold the reader like other financial books tend to do. The last thing anyone needs is yet another book that simply says, save more, and if you don't it's your fault.”

“I am developing an interactive space on our Retirement Equity Lab (ReLab) website where I answer questions from anyone. And my follow-on book is coming out in January, coauthored by Tony James, about what the government can do to save retirement (Columbia University Press),” she said.

Ghilarducci is an expert on retirement, pensions, and personal savings, and the Bernard L. and Irene Schwartz Chair in Economic Policy Analysis at The New School for Social Research. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley and taught previously at the University of Notre Dame.


How To Retire with Enough Money

Click to buy How to Retire with Enough Money


Chief Marketing Officer Geisinger Health

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 15, 2017

Witt/Kieffer is thrilled to announce a Chief Marketing Officer search we have just launched with Geisinger Health in Danville, PA. Since Dr. David T. Feinberg stepped into the CEO’s role in 2015, Geisinger has undergone a period of unparalleled growth, navigating the changing dynamics of healthcare and the competitive landscape. Click to read the entire Job Ad for Chief Marketing Officer Geisinger Health

Listen to podcast with Hilary Linder, director, Indivisible, about her film

Posted by Elena del Valle on August 7, 2017

Hilary Linden, director, Indivisible

Hilary Linden, director, Indivisible

Photo: Kudzu Films

A podcast interview with Hilary Linder, director, Indivisible (see With video – New film showcases challenges faced by Dreamers) is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, she discusses her film with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Hilary combines her knowledge in the fields of international development and humanitarian relief with her passion for nonfiction storytelling as the director and producer of Indivisible. She is the founder and president of Kudzu Films, a production company dedicated to spreading social justice through film.

Hilary monitored humanitarian emergencies for USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance and served as a programs manager at the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund, where she managed projects aimed at promoting job growth and smart, sustainable economic development. Hilary also has established education scholarships for children in Zimbabwe and Tanzania and conducted independent HIV/AIDS research in Rwanda. Indivisible follows three undocumented immigrants as they fight for a pathway to citizenship and a chance to reunite with family members.

To listen to the interview, click on the play button below, scroll down until you see “Podcast” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR Hilary Linder” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the August 2017 section of the podcast archive.